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Congress 2015

 


CSA members are now entitled to a 30% discount off all Canadian Scholars' Press book purchases when you order through cspi.org. To take advantage of your discount, email the title and ISBN of your requested book to orders@cspi.org and mention your CSA membership. CSPI will automatically invoice you at 30% off the cover price. Orders can also be placed by phone at 416-929-2774 ext. 10. To view the Canadian Scholars' Press catalog, visit www.cspi.org.

CSA Blog

Dec

3

World Congress 2018 Toronto?

The CSA under Pam Sugiman and Monica Boyd bid on the 2014 World Congress of Sociology. This Canadian bid came second to Yokohama, Japan. According to Eric Chow from the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, who partnered with CSA on the 2014 bid, ISA acknowledged that the Toronto bid was the best, but choose Yokohama to encourage Asian participation in world sociology. Eric Chow recently got in touch with the 2010-11 CSA executive to ask if we'd like to commit to a bid for 2018. It means making a commitment on behalf of a future Executive Committee, and for this reason we would need to know we had membership support before proceeding. Obviously, this could be a very exciting event for Canadian sociology. The last Canadian World Congress was in Montreal in 1998. Eric feels the time might be right for a return to this country. CSA would again partner with the Convention Centre on the bid, with some considerable finanical backing from the Toronto tourism department. We invite comments and views, either via the CSA blog, via e-mail, or by answering the question on this topic in the CSA poll. JG

Aug

9

Long Form Census

The recent decision of the Conservative Government—to cancel the mandatory long‐form census (2b) and to replace it with the voluntary National Household Survey—effectively undermines its commitment to research excellence as evidenced by the establishment of almost 2000 Canada Research Chairs, many of them in the humanities and social sciences. This decision, involving an Order in Council rather than widespread consultation with the stakeholders who depend upon quality census data, eliminates our most comprehensive and accurate source of longitudinal data. The social and economic consequences for Canada and our “common good” are profound.

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