Call for Papers: WORK IN A WARMING WORLD: Labour, Climate Change and Social Struggle

WORK IN A WARMING WORLD (W3): International Conference in Toronto, Ontario

November 29, 2013 to December 1, 2013

Abstract Submission Guidelines: We invite academics and activists to submit 250 word abstracts for individual papers and/or case studies. Each submission in Word file should contain the following: 1) names of the author(s) with the contact author listed first, 2) title of the presentation 3) 250 word abstract; and 4) all contact information for the primary author (email, address and telephone number). The file should be submitted electronically as an attachment to W3conf [at ] yorku.ca. For further information see: http://www.workinawarmingworld.yorku.ca/w3conference/. Deadline for abstracts is June 28, 2013.

More about the conference: Global warming is a universal concern, perhaps the greatest challenge facing work,  workers and the planet in the 21st century. The failure of the 2009 Copenhagen conference ensures that the climate change that is already altering national economies, will continue to accelerate. The Fourth Assessment Report of the IPCC (2007) estimates that agriculture, forestry, and industry produce 50% of GHGs without including energy or transportation emissions. The ILO’s 2011 Towards a greener economy notes that ‘over 80% of emissions (in the EU) originate from firms’ production of goods’.
There are three sides to the climate threat for work. Climate change is already changing how we work, what we produce, and where we produce it. It shifts employment within and between countries, regions and communities, creating millions of climate migrants in the global north and the global south, dislocating people and industries and futures. But as global warming ravages jobs, work itself produces significant greenhouse gases (GHGs). And as important as work is to slowing global warming, the role of work and workers has been strangely absent from policy and social science research. Labour and environmental movements have yet to effectively address the role of climate change in the world of work.
What role can workers and their unions play in slowing global warming?
Work in a Warming World (W3), a labour-environment-university research initiative1, is organising an international conference on the role of labour and work in the struggle to slow global warming. The Conference is for labour and environmentalists, students, community activists and the concerned public.

The Conference has three formats:

  • Paper presentation sessions
  • Best-practice, worst-practice: Panels on extreme climate events
  • Keynote addresses by international and Canadian speakers whose ideas make change happen in the world of work.
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