The Sociology of Child and Youth in Canada: Moving the field forward

Conference Highlights, Panels and Plenary, Professional Development
Sociology of Childhood and Youth

Revisiting the question posed by Albanese (2009) – “where has the sociology of childhood gone?”, this workshop will be a facilitated discussion exploring the current state of the field of child and youth studies in Canada, and investigating the potential directions we could move it forward as a collective and as individual researchers. While many things have changed over the last ten-plus years, child and youth studies continues to grow and establish itself as a field of study. In this workshop, emerging and established scholars will come together to discuss the current landscape of child and youth studies in Canada, and identify new priorities coming to light.

During our discussion, we aim to explore the following questions:

  • What is particular about child and youth studies in Canada – affordances, challenges, issues and strengths?
  • What potential possibilities might there be for collaboration with child and youth studies researchers/scholars in other contexts or disciplines?
  • Where do we want to take the field, moving forward?

The global pandemic has thrown the social impacts, influence, and experiences of children and youth into stark relief, which makes this a vital time to reflect on our work and think through what our community can bring to the field of child and youth studies.


Workshop Facilitators:
Noah Kenneally
Assistant Professor, Bachelor of Early Childhood Curriculum Studies Program
Human Services and Early Learning
MacEwan University

Noah Kenneally is an Assistant Professor in the Bachelor of Early Childhood Curriculum Studies Program in the Department of Human Services and Early Learning at MacEwan University in Amiskwacîywâskahikan/Edmonton, Alberta. He completed his PhD in Social Justice Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto, and taught at X (Ryerson) University in the School of Early Childhood Studies. His research interests include children’s perspectives of social life, their active involvement in socialization processes, caring early childhood practices as political practices, and children’s rights.

Hunter Knight
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

Hunter Knight is a PhD candidate in Social Justice Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. Her research centers on the entanglements between colonialism and constructions of childhood. Her dissertation explores these connections within the context of Waldorf elementary schools, examining how Waldorf educators navigate colonial legacies in the ways in which they understand childhood. Her work has appeared in Curriculum Inquiry and Global Studies of Childhood.

Organizers: Noah Kenneally, MacEwan University, Hunter Knight, OISE/UT