Conference Sessions

The Conference sessions are listed below in alphabetical order.  This information is subject to change until April 30, 2022.

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Exploring connections between the reconciliation of people and land

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In his 2018 chapter “Reconciliation here on earth”, settler political theorist James Tully suggests that there are two interconnected projects of reconciliation: “the reconciliation of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people (Natives and newcomers) with each other in all our diversity… [and] the reconciliation of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people (human beings) with the living earth” (p.83). This session features presentations that examine and critically engage with both of these projects and their interconnections. It aims to bring together work on collaborative environmental governance and co-management, Indigenous legal and political theory, and decolonization movements such as ‘Land Back’ for the purpose of sharing crosscutting challenges and opportunities associated with reconciling people and land.

Organizers: Luke Wonneck, University of Alberta, Ken Caine, University of Alberta

Facing the state: movement strategies in democratic and repressive contexts

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Papers in this session consider the dynamic relationship between state power and social movement activism in differing contexts. Drawing on a range of cases, they illuminate how regime type - from democratic to authoritarian - informs movement repertoires and practices, as well as considering how states themselves respond to the demands of collective actors.

Organizers: Emily Laxer, Glendon College, York University, Lisa Kowalchuk, University of Guelph

Feminist Sociology Research Cluster Meeting

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The CSA Feminist Sociology Research Cluster welcomes both continuing and new members with a feminist sociological approach. This cluster provides a communications hub and meeting places for feminist scholars within sociology to share ideas and research, to discuss common concerns within the discipline, and also to connect and converse with feminists within and across geographic and disciplinary lines. It encourages and organizes feminist sessions within sociology and also with other disciplines. This meeting is open to current members and those interested in learning more about our cluster activities. Attendees will have an opportunity to network with others working in this field of research and/or teaching. We welcome feedback on our current activities and encourage suggestions for future initiatives.

Organizers: Linda Christiansen-Ruffman, Saint Mary's University, Jolin Joseph, York University, Ronnie Joy Leah, Athabasca University, Lisa Smith, Douglas College, Ayesha Mian Akram, University of Windsor

Feminist Sociology: Body Matters

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This session features strong, interesting papers about body matters. Interconnections emerge among papers displaying wide-ranging analytic approaches and subject matters. Manca uses risk theory and content analysis of 438 texts of vaccines during pregnancy to describe how women are “responsibilized.”  Merritt’s critical discourse analysis of a TV program welcomes its lesbian visibility while identifying harmful tropes and assumptions. Piazzesi’s contemporary observations and theorization of beauty points her towards “constitutively” disqualifying contemporary possibilities of “women’s choices.” O’Connor theorizes from works by two Canadian artists whom, she suggests, used form and content to newly envision gender and agency of subjects.

Organizers: Linda Christiansen-Ruffman, Saint Mary's University, Jolin Joseph, York University, Ronnie Joy Leah, Athabasca University, Lisa Smith, Douglas College, Ayesha Mian Akram, University of Windsor

Feminist Sociology: Patriarchy and Violence Against Women and Girls

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Over the last millennium, a particular form of Patriarchy, (capitalist Euro-Patriarchy), has continued its expansive power within the world-system. It created new forms of sexism, racism, classism, and colonialism along with nation-states. That patriarchal system - based on greed, violence, and hierarchies - perpetuates itself in numerous ways that papers in this session explore.  Although the second wave of the global feminist movement achieved some social, political, and employment gains, for 50 years, eliminating violence against women and girls has remained a feminist priority without permanent solutions. Papers examine contemporary problems; some suggest innovative orientations and actions. Discussions follow.

Organizers: Linda Christiansen-Ruffman, Saint Mary's University, Jolin Joseph, York University, Ronnie Joy Leah, Athabasca University, Lisa Smith, Douglas College, Ayesha Mian Akram, University of Windsor