About

Welcome to the Sociology of Migration Research Cluster.

Our mission is to cultivate a stimulating, diverse conversation that brings upcoming students, distinguished professors, independent researchers, and outstanding research institutes/centers from across Canada together to share insightful and policy-relevant developments. Lending one’s voice to this discussion not only allows for mutual inspiration, but an opportunity to form new friendships and professional contacts who share a common passion for uncovering the problems, solutions, and patterns that make up our current ‘Age of Migration.’

We encourage those from different disciplines, theoretical perspectives, and methodological approaches to participate in the researching cluster panels held as part of the annual Canadian Sociological Association. Broadly speaking, sessions topics may include, but are not limited to the sociology of policy, international labor migration within the context of globalization, mixed and forced migration, global migration management, migrant detention, deportation and trafficking, transnationalism, return migration and remittances, social, economic and political integration processes, enclaves and ethnic economies, precarious legal status and livelihoods, the gender, racial and ethnic stratification and differential inclusion of migrants in transit and destination points, the pathways of the 1.5 and second generations, altered, hybrid and transformed identities, and the circumstances of temporary migrants, refugees and asylum seekers.

We are always searching for new participants and hope to have sparked your interest. Please explore the other subsections of our website for further information. If you are interested in recent information related to publications and meetings, please visit ‘Home,’ and if you are interested in learning about upcoming sessions and getting involved, please check out our ‘Calls for Session Papers.’ For all this information and more, please ‘Subscribe to our (low traffic) Mailing List.

Header image source:
Komagata Maru Incident, 1914