2021 Award Recipients

2021 CSA Award Recipients

Click each award title below to meet this year's recipient

 

Angus Reid Practitioner - Applied Sociology

Dr. Scott Davies, Professor
Program Coordinator, Educational Leadership and Policy Program
Canada Research Chair
OISE, University of Toronto

Student

Pedrom Nasiri MA MStJ, PhD Student
Department of Sociology, University of Calgary

 

Best Student Paper

Natalie Julia Adamyk, PhD Student, University of Toronto
“You can transfer skills you’ve gained over time”: Contingent Academics’ Use of Emotional Capital as Skilled Emotion Management 

 

Canadian Review of Sociology Journal Best Article

Dr. Emily Milne, MacEwen University and Dr. Terry Wotherspoon, University of Saskatchewan
Schools as 'Really Dangerous Places' for Indigenous Children and Youth: Schools, Child Welfare, and Contemporary Challenges to Reconciliation. Canadian Review of Sociology, 57(1):34-52. 

 

Early Investigator

Dr. Tahseen Shams, Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto.

 

John Porter Tradition of Excellence Book

Dr. Jeffrey Denis, McMaster University
Canada at a Crossroads: Boundaries, Bridges, and Laissez-Faire Racism in Indigenous-Settler Relations (University of Toronto Press, 2020)

 

Lorne Tepperman Outstanding Contribution to Teaching

Dr. Bruce Ravelli, University of Victoria

Honorable Mention

Dr. Alan Sears, Ryerson University

 

Outstanding Contribution

Dr. Terry Wotherspoon, University of Saskatchewan

 

Prix d'excellence en sociologie de langue française 

Dr. Jean-Philippe Beauregard, Dr. Gabriel Arteau, et Dr. Renaud Drolet-Brassard
Testing à l’embauche des Québécoises et Québécois d’origine maghrébine à Québec. Recherches sociographiques (LX, 1, 2019, p. 35-61).

 

Angus Reid Applied Sociology Awards / Prix des praticiens Angus Reid/de sociologie appliquée

 

Practitioner:  Dr. Scott Davies, OISE, University of Toronto

Dr. Scott DaviesDr. Scott Davies is a nationally and internationally recognized sociologist; reflecting both theoretical and empirical contributions to sociological publications. His work over the past two decades appears in highly ranked journals and academic presses. Moreover, he has utilized the popular press to disseminate his research findings and his work has been profiled extensively in the national press. Dr. Davies work has had a profound influence on education policy, program development, community planning for many government agencies, educational institutions as well as community organizations throughout Canada. As was noted in one of his supporting letters, Dr. Davies has a demonstrated record of using sociological research to advance the objectives of educational institutions as well as government organizations and policy makers. In addition, Dr. Davies has spent many years using his research to inform the practice and actions of non-profit organizations regarding educational issues. In addition, his research with non-profit organizations has influenced the tutoring and mentoring for impoverished communities. His contribution to “experiential learning” was a pioneering effort that has informed both educators as well as policy makers in Canada and around the world.

Dr. Davies has served as an ambassador for Canadian Sociology, demonstrating how empirical research can make substantive contributions to both public and policy discourse. His contributions have helped organizations navigate the difficulties of working with complex and slow-moving bureaucracies. His work utilizes the principles of rigorous social science protocol linked to applied issues in the field of education. Dr. Davies has been a champion of the sociological perspective in applied research for the past two decades.

 

Student: Pedrom Nasiri, University of Calgary

Pedrom NasiriPedrom is a PhD student in the department of Sociology, with a track record of combining their scholarship and their activism in ways that benefit the communities involved in their work, and that have the potential to make significant contributions to the academic literature. Pedrom’s work with the PolyamQ community in Calgary has been impactful in bringing that community into coherent existence as a community. The community conference that Pedrom spear-headed epitomizes the advances that can be made when the academy and the wider community are bridged in conscientious and innovative ways. Pedrom is a young scholar whose work demonstrates academic excellence while also exemplifying the highest standards of applied sociology.

Pedrom Nasiri is an academic trailblazer with a very promising future as both a scholar and a community activist. I am delighted to provide departmental endorsement of Pedrom’s nomination for this award.

The recipients of this student award is selected by the Department of Sociology at the University of Calgary.

 

 

Best Student Paper Award / Meilleur article étudiant

 

Natalie J. Adamyk, University of Toronto

“You can transfer skills you’ve gained over time”: Contingent Academics’ Use of Emotional Capital as Skilled Emotion Management

Natalie AdamykNatalie J. Adamyk, a 3rd-year Ph.D. student of sociology at the University of Toronto, is the recipient of the CSA’s 2021 Best Student Paper Award, for her paper entitled: “You can transfer skills you’ve gained over time”: Contingent Academics’ Use of Emotional Capital as Skilled Emotion Management”. Using the concept of ‘emotional capital’, this paper extends the recent scholarship on emotion management within contingent academia, currently academia’s fastest-growing sector, by focusing on how women in temporary academic jobs undertake emotion management by gaining and diffusing personal stocks of emotional capital. The results from 40 semi-structured interviews with women in universities across Canada indicate that these academics all acquire emotional capital, or stocks of emotional feeling and knowledge, both within and outside of the university, and knowingly deploy them within their jobs as teachers, mentors and colleagues. These experiences are not monolithic, however, as women in academia also often encounter gendered and racialized vectors of marginalization and difference. These differences result in women having to acquire and deploy different forms of emotional capital more acutely in different situations. The findings ultimately suggests that women in contingent academia have varying degrees of emotional agency, but, as emotional capital theorists note, are also confined, to differing extents, by structural boundaries and systemic forms of stratification within the university.

 

 

Canadian Review of Sociology Best Article Award / Prix du meilleur article de la revue canadienne de sociologie

 

Dr. Emily Milne, MacEwen University and Dr. Terry Wotherspoon, University of Saskatchewan
Schools as 'Really Dangerous Places' for Indigenous Children and Youth: Schools, Child Welfare, and Contemporary Challenges to Reconciliation. Canadian Review of Sociology, 57(1):34-52.

Emily MilneEmily Milne is an Associate Professor of Sociology whose research areas include the sociology of education, social inequality, and Indigenous peoples and policy. Her research program explores the development and implications of education for reconciliation activities in Canadian jurisdictions.

Terry WotherspoonTerry Wotherspoon is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Saskatchewan who has engaged in research and published widely on issues related to education, Indigenous peoples, and social inclusion, exclusion, and inequality in Canada. Dr. Wotherspoon is winner of the CSA’s Outstanding Contribution Award for 2021.

Quoting from the abstract, “Schools as ‘Really Dangerous Places,’” “...draws on 61 interviews with teachers and parents of Indigenous children in Alberta [to address] the question: what do intersections between schooling and child welfare systems contribute to prospects for meaningful reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada? Findings suggest that, despite formal commitments to acknowledge and address colonial legacies of residential schooling, obligations to fulfill state child welfare and educational objectives” continue to situate schools for many indigenous families, as ‘dangerous places.”

The awards committee agreed that the article has (quoting from members’ comments), “undeniable social relevance” and “brought new critical insights on the relationship between indigenous families and employees at euroCanadian/Western institutions.” The authors’ “use of Bourdieu’s fields to describe and analyze interactions and the unequal distribution of power and authority between schools, families, and social workers is quite original,” and their findings, “that two sets of institutions, [each] formally devoted to the best interests of clients, can undermine their shared goals, deserves more attention.”

 

 

 

Early Investigator Awards / Prix du jeune chercheur

 

Dr. Tahseen Shams, University of Toronto

Tahseen ShamsThe adjudication committee is pleased to award the 2021 Early Career Investigator Award to Dr. Tahseen Shams, Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto. Dr. Shams received her PhD in sociology from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2018 and has already established herself as a scholar whose high-quality work demonstrates theoretical rigour, methodological innovation, and a growing public profile. The committee was extremely impressed by Dr. Shams record of scholarship and her timely intervention in literatures around migration, race, religion, globalization, and shifting dynamics of identity. Dr. Shams has consistently published exciting contributions in important sociological and interdisciplinary journals, such as Racial & Ethnic Studies, Journal of Black Studies, and Diaspora, in addition to her book ‘Here, There, and Elsewhere: The Making of Immigrant Identities in a Globalized World’ published in 2020 by Stanford University Press. Her book has already received favourable reviews, and recognition for its incisive conceptualization of how immigrant identities are shaped by globalized connections across homeland, hostland, and ‘elsewhere'. The nomination letters of support discussed the significance of the sophisticated theoretical contributions of Dr. Shams’ work, as well as her careful and creative ethnographic skill. The committee was extremely impressed by Dr. Shams’ scholarly contributions and of the demonstrated potential her work has to reshape the sociological study of migration, identity, and globalization.

 

 

John Porter Award / Prix du livre John Porter

 

Dr. Jeffrey Denis, McMaster University

Canada at a Crossroads: Boundaries, Bridges, and Laissez-Faire Racism in Indigenous-Settler Relations (University of Toronto Press, 2020)

Jeffrey DenisThe John Porter Tradition of Excellence Book Award committee unanimously selected Canada at a Crossroads as this year’s award winner. The committee felt that the book encapsulates many salient issues revolving around racial inequality, ethno-racial relations, and resource distribution that are prominent in Canada today, while proposing applied solutions to the unequal relations between Indigenous and settler populations.

Denis’s 2021 award winning book examines “boundaries” and “bridges” in the relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous residents (primarily White) in the Rainy River District of Northwestern Ontario and unpacks the ethno-racial inequalities in the area. The book combines group position theory, settler colonial studies, critical race theory, and Indigenous theorizing

to analyse data sources that are multiple and rich, including in-depth interviews with residents of the Rainy River District, surveys, ethnographic fieldwork, a photovoice project, and historical texts. The entire committee was impressed by the depth of analysis, the quality of research, the meaningful research questions, and the important sociological and political contributions this book can and will make to Canadian society.

 

Lorne Tepperman Outstanding Contribution to Teaching/ Prix de contribution exceptionnelle Lorne Tepperman à l'enseignement

 

Dr. Bruce Ravelli, University of Victoria

Bruce RavelliThe winner of the first annual Lorne Tepperman Award in Teaching Excellence is Dr. Bruce Ravelli, Universityof Victoria. Dr. Ravelli has made important contributions to undergraduate teaching in a variety of venues outside his own university, including textbooks, websites, professional meetings, and professional journals. Dr. Ravelli’s website, Making Sociology Matter, shows how sociology can help to promote a better social world. As one judge wrote, “His contributions are a treasure chest of valuable, and often hidden, jewels that enlighten the sociological imagination.” In many ways, Dr. Ravelli has developed and promoted creative new techniques for teaching undergraduates that will appeal to younger generations of learners outside his own classroom.

Alan Sears

 

 

 

Honourable Mention: Dr. Alan Sears, Ryerson University

The runner-up candidate, Dr. Alan Sears, showed a strong and passionate dedication to classroom teaching, as evidenced in testimonials from students, advisees, and colleagues. He was particularly praised for reaching out to marginalized students and urging them to challenge structures of inequality, both within society and within sociological thinking. His contribution to classroom teaching and undergraduate students is exemplary.

 

 

Outstanding Contribution Award / Contribution remarquable

 

Dr. Terry Wotherspoon, University of Saskatchewan

Terry WotherspoonDr. Terry Wotherspoon, professor of sociology at University of Saskatchewan, is the recipient of the CSA’s 2021 Outstanding Contribution Award. He has earned his reputation as a distinguished and established scholar, publishing widely on issues related to education reform, teachers’ work, social policy, inequality, and Indigenous-settler relations in Canada. Beyond these areas of specialization, he has presented on and published about the Canadian criminal justice system, the Canadian child welfare system, immigration, family, and migration and citizenship. Demonstrating exceptional scholarly merit, he has authored 22 refereed journal articles and 57 chapters in books. He has also authored three books, including The Sociology of Education in Canada (currently in its fifth edition, Oxford University Press), and The Legacy of School for Aboriginal People: Education, Oppression and Emancipation (with Bernard Schissel, Oxford University Press). He has also given numerous invited presentations at Canadian and international academic conferences, symposiums, workshops, and for government (e.g., Saskatchewan Ministry of Education, Canadian Council on Social Development).

Dr. Wotherspoon has also been advancing sociology in Canada through his various and countless service roles and responsibilities at the University of Saskatchewan at the Department and University level, with professional/association committees, and in the broader community. He served as Managing Editor of the Canadian Review of Sociology (2008-2014), as the President of the Canadian Sociological Association (2015-2016), as well as representing the Canadian Sociological Association at the Congress of National Associations, International Sociological Association meetings (2018). Additionally, Dr. Wotherspoon has been a thoughtful mentor and advisor to numerous sociology undergraduate and graduate students.

Dr. Wotherspoon’s extensive contributions have been recognized through many awards, including the Canadian Education Association’s Whitworth Award for Educational Research (2002-2003), the Canadian Association of Foundations of Education Book Award (1998), the Canadian Sociological Association’s Outstanding Service Award in 2018. Dr. Wotherspoon has been a true advocate and an ambassador for Canadian sociology. The Canadian Sociological Association is honoured to be celebrating Dr. Wotherspoon’s productive career and wide-ranging contributions through its Outstanding Contribution Award.

 

Prix d'excellence en sociologie de langue française 

 

Dr. Jean-Philippe Beauregard, Dr. Gabriel Arteau, et Dr. Renaud Drolet-Brassard

Testing à l’embauche des Québécoises et Québécois d’origine maghrébine à Québec. Recherches sociographiques (LX, 1, 2019, p. 35-61).

L’article qui remporte la première édition du Prix d’excellence en sociologie de langue française est « Testing à l’embauche des Québécoises et Québécois d’origine maghrébine à Québec » de Jean-Philippe Beauregard, Gabriel Arteau et Renaud Drolet-Brassard, publié dans Recherches sociographiques (LX, 1, 2019, p. 35-61).

L’article repose sur une méthode de testing menée dans la région métropolitaine de Québec et montre qu’à candidature équivalente, les personnes d’origine maghrébine ont subi un taux net de discrimination de 49+%, leur candidature ayant été ignorée près d’une fois sur deux sur une base potentiellement discriminatoire.

Le comité de sélection souligne de manière unanime l’originalité de la recherche et de la méthode, la qualité de la rédaction et l’importance des résultats tant pour l’avancement de la sociologie que pour la lutte contre la discrimination.

 

Jean-Philippe BeauregardEn 2020, Jean-Philippe Beauregard a complété son doctorat en sociologie à l’Université Laval et il a cofondé l’entreprise EDDI (www.eddi.quebec) - Consultants en équité, discrimination, diversité et inclusion. Il est aussi chercheur associé au Centre d’études et de recherches sur les transitions et l’apprentissage (CÉRTA), de l’Université de Sherbrooke, et de la Chaire de recherche sur l’intégration et la gestion des diversités en emploi (CRIDE), de l’Université Laval. Enfin, Jean-Philippe est membre du Réseau interuniversitaire québécois de l’équité, de la diversité et de l’inclusion (RIQÉDI) et professeur au Cégep Limoilou depuis 2009.

Gabriel Arteau

 

 

Gabriel Arteau a poursuivi ses études en sociologie à l'Université Laval où il a pu parfaire son expertise en recherche autant à travers les enseignements de l'institution que par l'expérience concrète de deux projets de recherche qui ont mené à une publication. Il travaille aujourd'hui comme chercheur pour le laboratoire de recherche utilisateur du Studio Québec d'Ubisoft.

 

Renaud Drolet-Brassard

 

Renaud Drolet-Brassard est détenteur d'un baccalauréat en sociologie de l'Université Laval. Il a travaillé sur l’insécurité alimentaire chez les personnes âgées de 65 ans et plus de la Haute-Ville de Québec durant son laboratoire de recherche. 

 

 

 

 

The winning article of the first edition of the Prix d'excellence en sociologie de langue française is "Testing à l'embauche des Québécoises et Québécois d'origine maghrébine à Québec" (Testing in the hiring of Quebecers of Maghrebi origin in Quebec City) by Jean-Philippe Beauregard, Gabriel Arteau and Renaud Drolet-Brassard, published in Recherches sociographiques (LX, 1, 2019, pp. 35-61).

The article is based on a testing method carried out in the Quebec City metropolitan region and shows that, for an equivalent application, people of Maghrebi origin suffered a net discrimination rate of 49+%, their application having been ignored almost one out of two times on a potentially discriminatory basis.

The selection committee unanimously underlines the originality of the research and the method, the quality of the writing and the importance of the results both for the advancement of sociology and for the fight against discrimination.

 

2020 Award Recipients / 2020 Récipiendaires des prix de la SCS

See the Outstanding Graduating Student Award Recipients