Conference Sessions

The Conference sessions are listed below in alphabetical order.  The session details, schedule and locations are subject to change.

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A Racialized Govern‘mentality’: Racism in Government Institutions

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A government by the people for the people? Through different case studies, this session examines racism in government institutions in areas such as healthcare, education and (transnational) adoption. Through different qualitative methods, the papers first discuss the disproportionate access to quality healthcare for racialized minorities in terms of diagnosis and treatment in the medical industry. Second, they tackle how processes of adopting domestically and internationally become embedded in racial hierarchies, which are exacerbated by government policies. Finally, presenters trace the challenges embedded in collecting and protecting archival material for Black communities in Montreal. This set of papers in this session point to the workings of a racialized governmentality in different institutional settings.

Organizers: Jennifer Adkins, University of British Columbia, Jessica Stallone, University of Toronto, Carlo Charles, McMaster University, Jasmeet Bahia, Carleton University

Advanced Approaches to Research on Mental Health

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Research on the Sociology of Mental Health has changed over the past few years. These changes are largely related to theoretical and methodological advances in the discipline. This session exhibits researchers doing just that and considers innovations in understanding the differential exposure and vulnerability to stressors in all areas of life. Examples include novel approaches to studying Indigenous elders; contextual advances to understanding the impact of community on mental health; and, social capital approaches to understanding the complex mechanisms informing mental health outcomes.

Organizers: Marisa Young, McMaster University, Julia Woodhall-Melnik, University of New Brunswick

Agency among Children and Youth in Educational and Extra-curricular Activities: A Microsociology Perspective

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Children and youth are no longer “seen and not heard”, but rather their voices permeate the home and greater social sphere. Within education, sociologists have found that children have the ability to structure everything from their own participation during summer months (Chin & Phillips, 2004), to securing their own kinds of advantages and opportunities inside classrooms (Calarco, 2011, 2014, 2018). Sociologists have begun to note the interesting connections between child agency and microsociology. In tandem, these scholars encourage research with, rather than, about children and youth. We feature empirical, theoretical, and methodological papers that consider the autonomy of children and youth in endeavors related to their own development. Particularly, how do children and youth use their “capital” to secure advantages for themselves or navigate the various contexts of their own learning and extracurricular activities. This session should leave participants with a greater understanding of how children and youth are negotiating their own educational and extracurricular experiences in the 21st century.

Organizers: Cathlene Hillier, Nipissing University, Jessica Rizk, University of Waterloo

Aging and Society I: Inclusion, Exclusion, and Isolation

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Increased life expectancies and the overall aging of the population represent a significant demographic shift in Canada. Such a shift entails numerous social, political, and cultural changes and challenges, ones that have recently become the subject of increased sociological scrutiny. The papers in this session explore various correlates of social inclusion, exclusion, and isolation among older adults; they reveal the complexities surrounding questions of who is most visible, invisible, and vulnerable among this segment of the Canadian population.

Organizers: Dana Sawchuk, Wilfrid Laurier University, Tina Fetner, McMaster University

Aging and Society II: Care, Health, and Well-Being

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In light of increased life expectancies and an aging population in Canada overall, policy debates and public concerns frequently revolve around issues of care, health, and well-being for older adults. Within this context, sociologists have pressed for broader understandings of the factors that contribute to changes in the priorities and needs of older adults’ in various community, institutional, and everyday realms. Papers in this session contribute to these understandings by examining these changing priorities as well as the variety of stresses, strains, and creative possibilities involved in providing care and in providing adequate housing for older Canadians.

Organizers: Dana Sawchuk, Wilfrid Laurier University, Tina Fetner, McMaster University