Conference Sessions

The Conference sessions are listed below in alphabetical order.  Use the search box above to find sessions by keyword. This information is subject to change until May 15, 2023.

Quick Links:

 

Academic Reckonings: Responding to institutional hostility

| |
High profile critical scholars including Sara Ahmed, Charmaine Nelson, and Nikole Hannah-Jones have left academic positions because of the failure of their institutions to address systematic violence and exclusion. Not only did their respective universities fail to move forward on creating more inclusive spaces for equity-deserving groups but their institutions subjected these academics to personal hostilities and professional barriers. Ultimately, these scholars left their positions to write independently (Ahmed) or move to other universities (Nelson; Hannah-Jones). While leaving an institution - or academia altogether - is one response to institutional hostility, not everyone who experiences this hostility wants to leave their institution or is able to leave their institution. In this panel, we invite interventions that respond to hostility in academic institutions through differing forms of resistance. Such interventions may include leaving the institution, efforts to dismantle academia from within, engaging in union action, and institutional withdrawal, among others. We are particularly interested in prioritizing writing and experiences of historically and presently excluded scholars.

Organizers: Kristin Lozanski, King's University College, Western University, Irene Shankar, Mount Royal University

Animals in Society: Re-Imaginings

| |
The theme of the 2023 CSA annual conference is “Reckonings and Re-Imaginings.” In this session, scholars are invited to re-imagine our relationships with animals in myriad ways. Abstracts from any sphere of human-animal interaction (such as animal agriculture, companion animals, wild animal conservation, marine life, to name only a few) and any theoretical framework are welcomed. Grounded in a space of hope, this session will begin with re-imagining, and offer ways to bring such re-imaginings to life via action.

Organizers: Rochelle Stevenson, Thompson Rivers University, Sarah May Lindsay, McMaster University

Animals in Society: Reckonings

| |
The theme of the 2023 CSA annual conference is “Reckonings and Re-Imaginings.” Reckoning can be defined in a few ways: as a confrontation or settlement, or the process of calculation. In this session, we invite scholars to confront and analyze the ways in which the sometimes problematic and unjust relationships between animals and humans are rendered visible, and the impacts of such unequal relationships. This session aims to move towards a reckoning of the harms to humans and animals, with the goal of moving forward in a more just and equal society.

Organizers: Rochelle Stevenson, Thompson Rivers University, Sarah May Lindsay, McMaster University

Anti-Black racism in Canadian universities and its impact on Afro-Caribbean Black (ACB) students, faculty and staff

| |
Despite notable interventions to disrupt anti-Black racism in Canadian Universities, African Caribbean Black (ACB) students, faculty and staff encounter a white settler colonial social discourse, which negatively impedes on their academic development. The uncomfortable moment for ACB students, faculty and staff also leave many with a sense of unbelonging when entering academic spaces, as their experiences dealing with anti-Blackness is sometimes ignored by non-African descent student, faculty and staff. This social discourse does not recognize the intelligence or the need for ACB students to be educated, as it maintains and normalizes white undergraduate and graduate students as deservers of a "quality education." White settler Canada is rendered to be anti-Black. There is a grave misconception among non-African descent university community members that forms of discrimination based on race do not enter the academic communities. In actuality, the white settler Canadian colonial discourse knows no bounds and is very much associated with the university, creating how academic institutions function historically. What does it mean to be an ACB student, faculty or staff and experience forms of discrimination based on race in Canadian universities? Are Canadian universities purposely not acknowledging the white settler colonial discourse which serves to disrupt the academic achievements of ACB students? Despite the paucity of sustained empirical data, ACB students, faculty and staff are negatively impacted by racially charged stereotypes, which problematizes their academic experiences.

Organizer: Warren Clarke, University of Manitoba

Anti-Violence Research, Collaboration, and Knowledge Mobilization

| |
Violence research spans multiple scholarly disciplines and interconnects with knowledges of survivors, activists, legal professionals, policymakers, and service providers. As the recognition of structural dimensions of violence (and its various intersections) becomes increasingly prevalent across professional, political, and public discourses, sociologists are well positioned to contribute to the ongoing formation and mobilization of anti-violence projects. Efforts to integrate sociologically imaginative understandings violence with the experiences of survivors, advocates, and front-line practitioners provide exciting opportunities for the cross-pollination of critical insights on violence. This session invites papers concerned anti-violence “knowledge mobilization” in all its forms. These may include (but are not limited to): applied research projects; public sociologies of violence; communities of practice; trauma-informed research methods; anti-violence education; empowering survivors and/or engaging perpetrators; or theoretical and practical models for transformative justice, decolonization, and anti-oppression activism. Submissions reflecting cross-sector and/or interdisciplinary collaborations are especially encouraged.

Organizer: Robert Nonomura, Western University