Conference Sessions

The Conference sessions are listed below in alphabetical order.  This information is subject to change until April 30, 2022.

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Privacy and Technology

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Digital communications technologies present challenges to user privacy, including how privacy is managed, experienced and understood. Technological affordances, including algorithmically directed content, also influences how content may be flagged as inappropriate and censored (e.g., shadowbanning). This session explores the sociological dynamics and implications of privacy and technology, including user perceptions of the challenges entailed when engaging in ‘big data’ systems.

Organizer: Michael Adorjan, University of Calgary

Professions: Changes and Challenges

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Professionals in Canada are experiencing increasing challenges in the context of changes to professional regulation, the organization of professional work, culture change in professional organizations, and professional roles, identities, and values. This session explores the changing realities faced by various groups of professionals. Papers address issues such as: the transformation of professional self-regulating bodies; changes in the work relationships among different professional groups and the redefinition of professional roles; the adaptation of professional identity to the context in which professionals carry out their work; and, the role of professional instructors in achieving lasting organizational culture change. Collectively, the papers point to the importance of considering a variety of factors such agency, co-construction, community context, work meaning, and socialization processes in understanding the transformation of the work of professionals and the role of professionals themselves in shaping these changes.

Organizers: Vivian Shalla, University of Guelph, Karen Hughes, University of Alberta, Tracey L. Adams, Western University

Race and Ethnicity I: Resistance and Anti-racism Strategies

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In three case studies, this session explores the racialized experiences of Black, Indigenous and people of color and how these groups come together to resist against systems of colonialism and racism. These papers critically interrogate the notion that Canada and the United States are ‘post-racial’. Instead, they use critical race theory to shed light on how communities of colour are racialized in politics, social movements, education and religious institutions. The authors illuminate on the different resistance strategies that communities of color adopt

Organizers: Jennifer Adkins, University of British Columbia, Hyacinth Campbell, Brock University, Jessica Stallone, University of Toronto

Race and Ethnicity II: Systemic Racism and Structural Barriers

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On the world stage, Canada is often applauded for its diverse and multicultural population and for giving the impression that we all live well together, despite our differences. Canada is portrayed as a country that does not have problems of racism or racial conflict, all the while people have lived experiences contrary to this rhetoric. Rather than being celebrated racially and ethnically, diverse groups often bump up against barriers. The scholars in this session take an intimate look at individuals and groups who have been restricted or completely obstructed by social, political, education, and employment systems and structures because of their race, culture, language, or immigrant status. They problematize the ideas of multiculturalism and diversity and reveal areas that change is required.

Organizers: Jennifer Adkins, University of British Columbia, Hyacinth Campbell, Brock University, Jessica Stallone, University of Toronto

Race and Ethnicity III: Broadening the Subfield - New Conceptual Insights

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Advancing the discipline, extending literature, and addressing the gaps are all important components of research. Yet, it has been argued that there is a shortage of novel ideas and imaginative thought in scholarly work. This session includes research that broadens the subfield of Race and Ethnicity.

Organizers: Jennifer Adkins, University of British Columbia, Hyacinth Campbell, Brock University, Jessica Stallone, University of Toronto